Clayton Kershaw “Day to Day” With Back Stiffness

News that sent shudders through Dodgers fans everywhere broke today that Clayton Kershaw – Kid K, the franchise, the greatest pitcher in the game today – is battling issues with a stiff and sore back.

According to manager Dave Roberts, the pitcher who has carried the Dodgers on his back for most of the season, has received treatment for this condition for at least a few weeks. However, this morning was the first time news of it hit the general airwaves.

Kershaw’s last start was rocky. The usually reliable workhorse lasted only six innings and he took the loss. ocr coursework examples cornell supplement essay 2016 source site natural viagra juice https://elkhartcivictheatre.org/proposal/buy-smoking-paper-online-india/3/ click here example research paper https://medpsychmd.com/nurse/viagra-hong-kong/63/ thesis title marketing student custom thesis writing service learning english essay writing http://bookclubofwashington.org/books/mla-bibliography-how-to/14/ viagra buy cvs go go site i want to type a letter on my ipad do my factoring homework thesis on hypothesis testing write a descriptive essay martin luther king jr conclusion essay http://www.safeembrace.org/mdrx/is-viagra-on-nhs/68/ go site flu shot and prednisone cialis next day uk resume writing service temecula https://ncappa.org/term/essay-for-middle-school-students/4/ curriculum vitae writers service us good essay linkers achat de viagra au quebec https://elkhartcivictheatre.org/proposal/essay-on-water-and-its-uses/3/ source link https://www.nationalautismcenter.org/letter/creative-college-essay-ideas/26/  He gave up 9 hits, 4 runs, 2 walks, and only struck out four. Despite putting up numbers that matched the usual line for all the other Dodgers pitchers, Roberts insisted Kershaw’s ailing back had nothing to do with his mediocre performance.

That statement may be true, since Kershaw has been receiving treatments for weeks and he has still managed to put up an 11-2 record (tying him for the league lead), and a 1.79ERA. At 121 innings, Kershaw leads the majors in innings pitched, WAR (4.8), strike outs (145), and shutouts (3). In addition to all of that, his K to BB ratio is an incredible 20.1 to 1. The major league record is 11.6 to 1. It’s doubtful he could have put up those types of numbers with a bad back.

Kershaw was on the field in Pittsburgh this morning for his usual day-after workouts, and did not show anything was obviously bothering him.

At this point, we’ll have to take the skipper’s word for it that Kershaw will make his next start, this Friday against the Rockies. Fingers crossed!

Oscar Martinez

Oscar Martinez

I was born in the shadow of Dodger Stadium and immediately drenched in Dodger Blue. Chavez Ravine is my baseball cathedral, Vin Scully was the golden voice of summer all my life, and Tommy Lasorda remains the greatest Dodgers manager ever. My favorite things are coffee, beer, and the Dodgers beating the Giants. I also blog about my baseball card hobby at All Trade Bait, All the Time.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebook

118 thoughts on “Clayton Kershaw “Day to Day” With Back Stiffness

  1. 3rd post today.

    Is it a plan to divide and concur?

    Am I the only one thinking the DL pool is not going to get smaller in the second half?

    1. Badger
      I don’t think it is smart to let Kershaw fininish every game he wants to.

      Because he would, if it was possible, and he knows almost every other starting pitcher, doesn’t pitch deep into games.

      And he knows the team depends on every game he starts.

      And after writing this, I once again, I think of the starting pitchers the front office has signed for the rotation.

      They signed two pitchers, that never could be counted on, in there entire career.

      And then signing Beachy, and calling that depth.

      1. They hit the pause button with the rest of the team. Kershaw will leave his heart and soul on the field for this team and be broken down by age 30. Koufax II.

        1. Badger
          Good article at LA Times.com about Agone. He has had no problem with his back or neck, in the last three weeks. He said it was all mental. Just read it!

          1. Ok. I’ll try to read it.

            But until he actually starts hitting, I won’t believe it. He’s not that old. He plays first base, the easiest position in the infield and he has never run that hard. He has to my knowledge never been on thevDL. He should be able to hit. I will believe it when I see it.

          2. I read that same article. A-Gone said he was overthinking his at bats. Good article and insight to the mind of a big league hitter.

          1. Michael
            That is why I wanted Badger to read it. Just me saying that it has been mental, really can’t totally describe what Agone has been struggling with.

    1. Roger
      You know that pitcher they started for that first game in Pittsburgh.

      Guess which team claimed him?

      Of course the A’s.

  2. I am not even thinking this will happen: The Giants keep streaking and the Dodgers keep fumbling.

    I really don’t think both teams will keep their respective paths up. But what if they do?

    Would we really become sellers? I would hope so, but I don;t tink Giggs and Kasten will allow it!

      1. Yeah, welcome to the conversation Mark.

        Yes, being sellers is a possibility and like some of us have suggested it fits right into the 2018 plan. We have several players that people want. But, the deadline is still a month away. A lot can happen in a month. Try to win every day until then, but if the gints keep winning, and we continue being 10 games under .500 when Kershaw doesn’t pitch, it could be time to sell.

  3. So – what starter other than Kershaw is consistently capable of going more than 5 innings? 6 innings?

    How long will the Dodgers be forced to carry an 8 man ‘pen?

    Who other than Seager is capable of hitting .280? OPSing over .800?

    With this roster, how can the Dodgers make up 7 1/2 games with the Giants?

    How did the team end up with this mess?

    How do you fix it? Is it fixable this year?

    1. A lot will depend on what happens in the next month. If the team can gain some ground on the Giants there will be pressure to try and make one or two trades; if they fall behind in the wild card they could be sellers. It looks like they’ll have to make do with what they have now (and at OKC) until then.

  4. Even if we don’t catch sf, there are still 2 wild card spots. We are leading the NL in the wild card race. Hell, we have the 4th most wins in the NL; go figure.

    We’re in the race for the playoffs, so talk of selling is a bit ridiculous. Seager is a stud. Turner has woken up. Joc is hitting the ball much better lately; even his outs are harder hit now. Puig looks much better since he came back. Howie is hitting the ball harder. We’re good enough to get to October. But we do need to either shore up the 8th inning, or get a #2/3 starter that can go 7. Obviously Urias won’t be dealt, but after that, who knows.

      1. I can’t, and dont, read the Times anymore. Every time I try to go there they ask for money. Pop up ads aren’t enough for them I guess.

        1. Badger
          I don’t have a subscription to the Times either. It let me read this article.

          I think they let you have three or four looks, and then that thing comes up.

          And I really think I have seen more then three this month.

  5. Dodgers cannot be true sellers. Who do you sell other than Kershaw? And surely not the Kid.

    Maybe Turner, maybe Jansen. That is it. Then the GM will just have some more depth in the minors — with nothing to show for next season.

    1. Turner, AGon, Kendrick, Kazmir, Grandal, Jansen, Puig, Baez, Blanton, Hatcher, Coleman, Wood, Howell…. we have role players that teams would want.

      It’s too early to be serious about it here, but you know management has to be thinking several weeks ahead. You have plans, and you have alternate plans and you have contingencies. In long tactical puzzles the most successful GM’s can think 10-15 moves ahead, and that’s after weeding out inferior choices. You can bet somebody on the staff is working this problem.

  6. I think you can sell Kendrick, Utley, Jansen, Kazmir, Ryu, Wood, Gonzo, Turner, Grandal, Puig, Blanton and maybe Ethier if healthy. They will have to eat some salary (not a lot). Stockpile more farmhands.

    1B – Van Slyke/Bellinger
    2B – Johnson/Hernandez
    SS – Taylor
    3B – Seager
    LF – Verdugo
    CF – Pederson
    RF – Thompson
    C – Barnes

    Rotation:

    Kershaw
    Stewart
    De Leon
    Cotton
    De Jong

    Go for it!

    1. Mark, you have finally lost your mind. Do you really think that this front office would actually unload all those players???? Ethier is not even projected to be ready before August, and that means at least 21 days of rehab. You are not really thinking, you are totally delusional. Bellinger is a AA player, and I doubt ready for prime time, Johnson cannot field, Hernandez cannot hit, Verdugo, and Taylor have yet to prove they can do anything, and Barnes has not really been all that great when he has been up. Man whatever you have been smoking, you need rehab…

    2. Oh, also, trading the 25 year old Puig, who has a huge future in front of him makes the least sense of all…..Thompson is no where close to the OF Puig is, and he also is not hitting….what you are doing is throwing the season away, and getting ready for 2018……sorry, the Dodgers have never pulled a rebuild like that.,…..the fans would revolt

      1. Michael I agree about Puig. I don’t want to trade him. But as I have frequently mentioned, I don’t think the new management team believes in the roster they inherited. The first obvious clue for me was the tepid deadline move last year. Everyone knew what was needed to put the team over the top and it flat out was not done. Hell, they didn’t even try. And then the off season – every move has been budget motivated. We go through the Bolsinger, Stripling, Tepesch, Stewart moves, we even brought up a 19 year old a full year early. The bullpen is held together with duct tape. We sign older way past their prime veterans, hoping that by platooning them they will last until the the team THEY want comes together down the road. The moves made by these guys just have not worked and the team has slowly been losing ground since they took over. If we are still 7-8 games behind at the deadline NOTHING these guys do will surprise me. I suggest to all Dodgers fans to read the leaves. This management team is turning the roster over and it will continue until they have the WAR machine they envisioned when they were hired.

        1. Badger
          I agree with what you say about them wanting to be the only creator of there future team, but that might be there down fall.

          If there ego is to big to recognize young good talent, that is already here, they won’t last long!

          And they often had veteran players, on there teams, when they were at both the Rays, and the A’s.

          That is part of the way they build there teams, along with players, that can play many positions, as you know.

          They think they can save money that way, but this a big market team, and like I have already said, what do they know about running a big market team? Badger how our you going to feel, if in 2018 the Dodgers are not doing much better, then now?

        2. I agree about the deadline move last year for sure, and I also read a story that the Braves GM is sorry he ever made that deal. My main bitch, and I am sure you are close on this, is that they seem to have no solid plan for right now. They are stumbling along, patching together the team, and hoping for lightning in a bottle. That rarely happens in the majors. And what about all those Cuban players they have signed who were supposed to be close to MLB ready. I have heard nothing about Sierra since spring training, and nothing about any of those other guys at all. Sierra was supposed to be either a starter or reliever. They envisioned a war machine alright, made of paper mache. Stockpiling players is one thing if they are good and going to contribute to the team.

          1. It looks to me like the plan for this year is to let the same guys turn it up or flame out. The purchases have a pattern and I look for more of the same. I anticipate nothing big from these guys as to do so would retard the ’18 plan. We will need all of our top 10-15 prospects to pull it off. Some will be used to bring in functional WAR guys in trade, some will be on the roster and 2-3 free agents will be added when the current bloated contracts are eased off the books. That process has been started.

            It might work. We have some young, cost controlled players now, and we are the Dodgers so the severe Tampa/A’s payroll restrictions wont apply. You can do a lot with $200,000, if done right. Others have proven that.

  7. I had a manufacturers rep from Atlanta in my office yesterday and when he found out I was a Dodgers fan he said “I’m glad you have Kasten and you don’t. He’s like Bill Poulian – he can put a good team on the field most years, but sometimes you just have to blow it up like the Ricketts did in Chi-Town.

    The Cubs have proven the best way to rebuild is to blow it up, but Guggs and Kasten believe the fans would revolt, so that are making Friedman do it like this. Probably – This team needs something… however.

    1. What’s got into you. You are starting to make sense. Or, is it me. I’ve been on the edge for months. Did I fall over?

      1. Badger
        Even with the money they have spent.

        They could have done a much better job.

        How can you trust them blowing this team up, and then building it up?

        You don’t sign two veteran pitchers that have had long injury histories, to fill your starting rotation.

        Especially when only one of these two pitchers, has been able to pitch 200 innings once, in there entire career.

        Where is the proof that they know how to run a big market team.

        Theo had already been with a big market team, before he went to Chicago.

        If they were so concerned about money, why did they trade Gordon and Haren, and pay there salaries?

        I know that Haren did give up HRs at times, but he made his starts.

        And he was actually getting better as the season progressed.

    2. Comparing Kasten to Bill Poulian is like comparing a Yugo to a Mercedes. There is no comparison.

      And no one is making Friedman do it this way. That’s just an excuse. So when he/they offered Grienke, that was all a ‘lie’? Yeah right. Keep buying what they are selling. They had never won anything before and will not win anything going forward. Without Kershaw on this team, this team would be a joke. And to think they were 3 times division champs. Those days will be long gone soon.

        1. That’s easy. Kasten is of German origin, means grain bin. Poulian is French, means chicken. Yugo is English. Means beat it. And they both drive a Mercedes. Or their wives do. And all their children do. Grandkids will be getting one.

        2. So signing Grienke was part of the plan AND not signing Grienke was part of the plan…..see any hypocrisy?

          Bill Poulian….Buffalo Bills Wall of Fame inductee 2012, NFL Hall of Fame, 2015, Indianapolis Colts Ring of Honor, 2017. 6 times Executive of the Year.

          Stan Kasten……

          1. Stan Kasten is no chump. At age 27 he became the youngest general manager in the National Basketball Association, for the Atlanta Hawks. He held this position until 1990, while becoming the Hawks’ president in 1986. During his lengthy tenure in the Hawks’ front office, Kasten became the first (and so far the only) NBA executive to win back-to-back NBA Executive of the Year awards, accomplishing this feat in 1986 & 1987. He was also able to build Atlanta into a perennial playoff contender. Led by the Hall of Fame play of superstar Dominique Wilkins, Kasten’s Hawks achieved four straight 50-win seasons (1986 to 1989) and set franchise records in attendance. In the 1990s, he guided Atlanta to a stretch of 7 consecutive playoff appearances, including three 50-win seasons during the decade.

            In 1999, Kasten became the first sports figure to hold the title of president of three different teams in three different major sports simultaneously. He accomplished this unique feat with Major League Baseball’s Atlanta Braves, the National Basketball Association’s Atlanta Hawks and the National Hockey League’s Atlanta Thrashers.

            From 1991 to 2005, the Braves won 14 straight division titles, 5 National League pennants and the World Series championship in 1995 (The 1994 season was ended prematurely, without titles or postseason play, cut short by the players’ strike.)

            That said, I do not like Kasten, but to call him a Kia is hard to do when he has the same number of Championships as Poulian… and I like Bill!

          2. I must have missed all of the Atlanta Hawks title runs in the 80’s. That was even before MJ came along and dominated. Next, you’ll be attempting to tell me how great of an executive Jerry Krause was while with the Bulls.

            Anyone that understands NBA knows that one dominating type of player has more influence on his team’s performance than any of the other sports.

            Quick, tell me who played with Dominique Wilkins. That’s what I thought, had to go and look it up. Kasten was in the right place to get ‘undeserving’ credit…..and NEVER won a championships with Atlanta.

            Only with a HOF manager and the best pitching staff in the nineties was he able to milk out 1 championship. And most all of that was NOT his doing. He was the President and ‘As president of the Braves, he delegated all baseball decisions to Atlanta GM John Schuerholz, who put together strong, talented teams.’
            He wasn’t all that! Just another guy selling you a bill of goods while earning a big paycheck.

        3. Every one knew they offered Greinke 5 years, he went back to the Dodgers after the D-Backs offered 6 to see if the Dodgers would match it, they would not….so he is now a Dirtbag.

          1. Of course they offered him 5 years…..they could have upped his per year monies over 5 years to where that would have sufficed for him.

            But your missing the point getting into the details of Grienke’s contract.

            Will simplify it. Did FAZ want to sign Grienke? By offering him 5 years, that would imply that they did. They failed.
            And someone acting like, ‘who cares, not part of the plan anyway’ is making excuses for Friedman.

            They wanted Grienke at a hometown discount. They want everyone at ‘bargain’ costs so now that is why the Dodgers have all of these marginal and injured pitchers.

            They had no contingency plan. They have no vision. They don’t even evaluate talent very well. We’ll see how many times they attempt to turn over their scouts, coaches and medical personnel. In just one year under their control it’s safe to say that each of these areas has been turned over once already. Should be smooth sailing now. Don’t want to hear any FAZ-o-maniacs making excuses when things go south.

          2. Chili, I am not a FAZ fan and have never been. I always thought that not signing Greinke would be a huge mistake, and it was…..all we have to do is look at the results for his so called replacements

          3. Michael-

            I realize your not a FAZ-o-maniac. Just not letting the FAZ supporters play both sides as they will begin to do.

    3. Epstein never ‘blew’ up the Red Sox when they won 2 Championships. The Giants never ‘blew’ it up when they won 3 titles in the past 6 years. That’s all a cop out and an attempt to make it appear that is the ONLY way of winning a Championship. It is not! Of course FAZ wants to pursue the long term plan…..as I had pointed out a few weeks ago, he’s making $7M per year. A pay raise of over 3 times what he had been making. If I was him and could get away with it I would want to go with the long term plan as well.

      Just think about it. Epstein who has 2 titles, makes $3.5M while Friedman makes $7M per year. Doesn’t want to pay for superior talent but his ‘lack of talent’ is over paid. He will milk this for as long as he can. Some of you are talking 2018…..when 2018 comes around that year will be pushed back to 2020 or later.

      1. Chili
        Both you and Snider make good points.

        Snider was right, when he said that it was just a natural occurrence that happened with the Cubbies.

        How do you blow up a team, that never really was much of a winner.

        And Theo didn’t blow up the Red Sox either, like you said.

        Also you are right about the Giants not having to blow up the team, to win.

        The Giants have won with a lot less, then most teams have had.

        In fact, the current Giant’s team, has better starting pitching, then they had, in there last two World Series.

        Bumgarner almost alone, pitched the Giants to there last World Series.

        1. MJ,

          You are correct about the Giants pitching. That is what has some of us that are not drinking the blue Kool-Aid worried. Honestly, it is shaping up to be a Cubs-Giants battle for who goes to the World Series. Both have good Managers and good starting pitching.

          That being said, there is a lot of season left and injuries can and will play a big part.

        2. I would disagree on the natural occurrence as Epstein immediately begin trading away all of his big contracts, i.e. Soriano, Samardzija, Marmol & Ramirez for prospects. He wanted Rizzo and traded for him. Good move. He traded for Jake Arietta. He traded for Addison Russell. He drafted Kris Bryant and Kyle Swarzber. Good draft picks!

          Signed a top of the line, EXPERIENCED Manager.

          See a trend. That’s not just ‘natural occurrence.’ That’s someone that understands baseball talent and potential.

          Then signed Lester. Then Lackey, Heyward and Zobrist. Has even more talent in the minors.
          If Friedman is making $7M a year then Epstein should be making $70M per year cause he is at least 10 times more knowledgeable when it comes to building a championships ball club.

          1. OK, Chili, I guess what I meant is that when a team has no chance to contend it’s easier to trade your few good players, plus you get higher draft picks every year. No one would argue that Theo didn’t do a great job.

          2. I understand. Yes, in todays sports world the easiest way to get better is to get worse first. Its all good.

  8. The Dodgers called up Trevor Oaks from Tulsa to pitch at OKC last night. He pitched 6 innings but gave up 6 runs on 10 hits. Welcome to AAA – he’s not far behind Brock Stewart. I’m a big fan of Stewart but worry because he has only been pitching for 2 years. We will find out tomorrow!

    Frias went 5 at OKC in the other game of the doubleheader and gave up 2 runs.

    Brandon McCarthy went 5 at RC last night allowing 3 ER. He might get one more start. He threw 72 pitches. 56 for strikes. I hear he was hitting 94 MPH.

    1. Mark
      I rather see this young guy pitching from the Dodger’s farm system, then the pitchers, they get off the scrap heap from other teams, after they have let them go.

  9. I doubt that the Dodgers will be outright “sellers” at the deadline – the fans would revolt. Besides, the team is too close to a wild-card slot.

    They will probably grab a crappy pitcher or two (shades of ’15) and maybe a bat – nothing too expensive or too long term.

    I can see them trading one or more of the current roster as I do not believe that the team is committed long term to anyone on the current roster except Kershaw, Seager or Urias.

    Don’t be surprised if they unload Jansen – they won’t resign him next year and he will be a free agent – and the Braintrust believes that relievers are fungible and not particularly important.(Like managers)

    Don’t be surprised to see a change in the coaching staff before the end of the season – hitting coach is on a short leash.

    1. rick, you have been one of the most clear headed posters in here since the beginning of the season. Please read my response to Michael above. I’d like to hear your opinion.

      1. I think that your observation that the new management is looking to remake the roster in its own image is a fair take.

        The roster and coaching staff inherited by the Braintrust was moderately successful but flawed. They had won 2 straight division titles but were unable to advance to the Series. They were built on 2 great starters, an iffy bullpen, and a roster with sometimes big bats (Kemp, Hanley, Puig, Gonzalez, Ethier) but poor defense and bad attitudes. The manager (Mattingly) was capable of keeping the players playing (hence the 42-8 run after a last place start) but Mattingly’s deficiencies are well documented and they changed 3rd base coaches mid way through last season.

        The decision not to resign Hanley was a good one – getting rid of Kemp was a salary dump plus they didn’t like his attitude. Dumping all of the coaches/manager except Honeycutt is all part of the deal.

        As Mark has written, this is their way of “trying to win now” while rebuilding. The “win now” part is not really working, but they have set up the roster so that by 2019, the only veteran under contract will be Maeda. They will have totally rebuilt the roster by then – I expect that Honeycutt may be gone by then too.

        Anyone trying to guess who will be on the Dodgers by 2019 will be doing just that – guessing. We assume that many of the prospects whose names are bandied about will probably be on the roster – but maybe not, especially if they are prospects signed by the previous administration. If I had to guess, I would guess that a few of our prized pitching prospects will be on the roster and in the rotation by then – maybe some from among Bellinger, Verdugo, et al. I think that they will continue to trade for other teams’ prospects, al la Thompson if they don’t like the Dodgers’ prospects.

        I also predict the kind of roster churn that fans of the A’s and Rays have had to tolerate for years – they will trade players before they become too expensive for even more prospects.

        Dodger fans better get used to rooting for the name on the front of the jersey – they won’t have time to learn the names on the back of the jersey.

        1. I agree with everything you say Rick. This is a whole new regime. They have no sense of team history, and no loyalty to the fans who have followed this team with all their hearts for most of their lives. I have never had another team as my team. I am a lifelong Dodger fan. Not one of those guys in the front office except Magic Johnson even has a connection to Los Angeles. I was born and raised there, went to my first Dodger game at the coliseum in 1958….they were playing the Cardinals, and Stan Musial was in LF. Solly Hemus was the Cardinal manager. There was a huge brawl when Drysdale plunked Joe Cunningham. Different era, different philosophy. I liked the old days better. The ballplayers were not millionaires, and had offseason jobs. The game was more pure. Today it is all analytics, and saber metric nerds instead of scouts looking for genuine skills. Bench players were just that back then. When they went to 162 games, it took something away. But it was still baseball. The DH and pitchers who became specialists, well that was something that began what I call the long slide. BP pitchers used to be old veterans on their last legs. They were called mop up guys. The game is different, the players are different, the way teams are built is totally different. I quit rooting for the name on the back when they traded Piazza. I root for Kershaw because he is one of the best I have seen. Trust me, I have seen some great ones. When people used to compare Randy Johnson to Koufax, I laughed. There is no way you compare the two, just like there is now way you compare the Dodgers of then, to the team now. It is a money making business. All player decisions are tied to that. They want to give the fans the impression that they are trying to win, and at the same time, they are trimming payroll, and molding the Dodgers to what they think they should be……The Los Angeles Tampa Rays…….

          1. Solid takes guys.

            I’m going to go with my “this could work” position as it allows me to keep watching this team. I already figured this year was going down the toilet, and even though they are yet to do it, I’m going to pretend that when the time comes they will pull the trigger on a Trout trade or a Harper $350 million contract. First things first, blow up that team that failed in the playoffs 3 straight years. That will take a few minutes.

    2. Dodger rick
      That is the front office’s problem.

      Lets see how they handle Kershaw, in his opt out year.

      But they need to deal with Kershaw before that even comes up.

      And with Cory they need to do the same thing that the Angels did with Trout.

      If they fool around and let him go unsigned, through the years, before his free agent year.

      They will eventually be gone.

  10. Finally read the Times piece. Used the wife’s phone. Not sure it revealed much. AGon isn’t hitting and its in his head? Makes no sense. The guy has seen it all and he’s been doing it for 14 years. He should still be able to swing a bat, and he hasn’t. Sit him for a week, pinch hit, whatever. He’s not right.

    Don’t know it means anything but attendance is down almost 2,000 a game. Still lead the league and will draw 3 million because tickets are already sold, but, this team isn’t all that exciting and LA knows it.

  11. What’s probably in AGon’s mind is that he is older and probably questions whether he can do the same things as before with the same results. For the first time in his career some things that have always worked aren’t working. Maybe a kinda’ yips. Doubt has probably set in, and rightly so. It’s tough getting old, and for these high performers, it must be really hard. Trade Puig while you can still get something for him, something we sorely need, a solid starting pitcher. Grienke-lite, maybe. He’s had a couple of ok games, so we go WOW again; a false sense of security, I think. He will go into his 0 for a week slump sometime soon. But he is having fun, and with Manager Happy, all is good.

    1. Bobbie17
      Did you even read the article?

      And we will see in this series, because I believe that Agone likes hitting at the Brewers place.

  12. From Houston Mitchell:
    “Before Sunday’s game against the Pirates, Kershaw was stretching when the Pirates’ mascot, the Pirate Parrot, walked around him while steering a radio-controlled car. He drove the car right next to Kershaw, obviously annoying him.

    Now in no way do I blame Kershaw’s loss on what the mascot did. However, it was a stupid thing to do, and something you are more apt to see in a high school game, though most high schoolers have more sense than the guy in the Pirate Parrot suit.”

    Only on idiot would dress up in a stupid costume anyway…

  13. Also from Houston Mitchell:
    So, keeping in mind that an OPS+ of 100 means you are league average, here are the OPS+ scores for the current Dodgers, excluding Chris Taylor, who has played only one game:

    Seager, 139

    Pederson, 117

    Justin Turner, 109

    Thompson, 107

    Chase Utley, 100

    Gonzalez, 95

    Puig, 81

    Grandal, 75

    Kendrick, 71

    Hernandez, 71

    Van Slyke, 70

    Ellis, 64

  14. I was one of Puig’s defenders at the beginning. But like someone mentioned earlier I trade him now. He will be the key to getting a solid #2 pitcher. He’s young and has a ton of potential, but I am a firm believer that it won’t be here. He does not have the mental chops to be the man. He’s playing the way he is because he’s expected to do heavy lifting and that is not his game.

    His the quirky laissez faire type that his game is based on how he’s feeling. In short he’s not a pro. Gonzalez, Seager and turner – those are pros. When their best is needed they use their intellect to succeed regardless of the situation while puig will mope and still be thinking about that last ground out, strike out or error and try to make up for it by swinging for the fences instead of playing smart. Please don’t think that I am calling Puig dumb because he’s far from it, but the maturity that he needs to play with is not coming soon.

    I can see him taking his game to the next level taking when he’s in his late 20s. Unfortunately I don’t think it’ll be in LA. He has value so if prefer to use it now for someone that is focused and a pros pro.

    1. And who do you replace his bat with??? There is no quick fix, Thompson could do the job defensively, but is still a work in progress with the bat…

  15. Just a little story here……Have any of you ever been on the field at Dodger Stadium? And I do not mean for post game fireworks or a concert. I mean before a game that means something. I have, I sang the national anthem there on Sept, 9, 1981, before a Dodger-Giant game. I had met Wes Parker at a baseball card show, and he came to see me do a show at George’s Round-Up in Long Beach. I was playing with a band called Danny Michaels and the Rebel Playboys. I told Wes that my dream was to do the anthem, not because I was a vet, but because I loved the Dodgers, and music that much. He told me he would check and see what I had to do. He was true to his word, I sent my tape in and got a letter from the Dodgers in March with my date and tickets and a parking pass. That was a strike year, so when they went on strike I was not sure what would happen. When the strike was over I got another letter confirming my date. On the night I sang, I got to go into the Dodger dugout with Wes, met players, and coaches, and got the ball he gave me signed by many, including Sax and Sutcliffe. Was taken out to CF where they set up the mike in those days. Guy asked me if I needed to warm up and I told him no…….the organ began the intro, and I thought she was in the wrong key……but she was not…..I sang in front of 50,000 people that night, and the radio audience, and I do not think that I ever sounded better. I was taken through the tunnel in RF that leads to the clubhouse, met Frances Friedman, the lady who used to twirl garlic to stop opposing teams rally’s, got my ball autographed by Sutcliffe at the clubhouse, and went to my box seat……a great experience…once in a lifetime, but what I remember most……Penguin getting his arm broke by the Giant pitcher, Garvey tying the game with a late inning hit, and then them losing when the Giants scored 3 in the 10th…..but I sang for what became a championship team…that they can never take from me……………another memory from that game…..Fernando was walking in from the bullpen with Bobby Castillo, and they both shook my hand…….awesome..PS…..I was wearing my cowboy Stetson, and a red western shirt

    1. Wow. What a story! I’ve been asked not to sing many times but never at Dodger Stadium. Very cool Michael….. I mean Bear.

      1. Thanks Badger…the only thing I have left from that night is a picture that they took of me and Jay Johnstone in front of the dugout. You can see Manny Mota behind us. The ball I gave to my son, and he eventually misplaced it….so I have no clue where it is…..But I have the memory of a lifetime…….baseball and music……my 2 favorite things…..

    2. Nice little change of gears to tell something personal about your connection to the Dodgers. Most of us don’t have our own stories that really compare to yours, but we all have those personal memories that illustrate the roots of our connection to the Dodgers.

      Honestly, this place kind of needed it.

      1. My biggest regret Patch……..I forgot to get Fernando to autograph my ball……dumb….just a total brain fart……..but I had Wes’s 6 time gold glover, Manny Mota, all time pinch hit leader at the time, 2 rookies of the year, Sax and Sutcliffe, a no hit pitcher in Jerry Ruess, and a couple of other guys I cannot remember….oh yeah,. Danny Ozark who went on to manage the Phils, and I gave Tommy my 1954 Tommy Lasorda baseball card…….I had 8 so I could spare it….

  16. An aside to the above story…I was living in a home for kids in Highland Park. Next to the home there was a huge ravine and hills. In the winter of 1959 they began filling in the ravine and they built homes. It was on Ave. 66 in Highland Park. Larry Sherry and his brother Norm bought houses there. They were 2 and 5 doors down from the home…Before they left for Vero, they practiced at Arroyo Seco Park. We kids would shag flies for them. Fairly, the Sherry brothers, and a batboy named Lefebvre were there…..we also got to meet my hero at the time, Tommy Davis……..

    1. Michael
      I’m happy you had that great moment.

      And you are right, no one can ever take that moment from you.

      I was so glad that the Dodgers finally won that World Series over the Yankees that year.

    2. Another cool story, Larry gave the glove he used in the 1959 series to a kid who lived next door to him..he also rarely drove the Vette he won as MVP of the series..

  17. By the way……you guys can call me Bear…..that is my nickname anyway, and what most people address me by

    1. Just pulled up an album cover for On the Bandstand. A hottie on what looks like a Goldwing and 4 guys in a gold Lincoln. That you?

      1. No, I was a guest star. Danny was the band leader…..The Lincoln and the bike belonged to George. He had them in the window of the club…was a huge place on PCH……no longer there……I think he is holding a double necked Gibson in that pic….

        1. cool story! I also got to go on the field once, pregame

          I played trombone in 7-9th grades in band. So back in 1986 I believe (9th grade), we got to go on the field pre game and, along with other local high school bands from Santa Clarita Valley, play the national anthem. I was standing directly behind 2nd base, on the grass just beyond the infield dirt. It was a surreal experience, being 14 years old and looking up at 40,000 people. I was stunned by the noise from the applause afterwards.

          Definitely a cool feeling, but I was surrounded by over 100 band members, and not solo like you!

          1. I used to get asked if I ever got stage fright or nervous. I can only remember one time when my knees were a little wobbly, that happened at a talent show at the Palomino Club in North Hollywood. Never felt that way before or since….always knew I had the voice and the range to do what I wanted. But that night, James Burton was in the audience……he was Elvis’s lead guitar player. That was a surreal experience. I always admired the King, because he had just about the most range I had ever heard. I did a lot of shows at a small club in Carson with some pretty famous country stars, and not once did it bother me, but singing in front of the Kings lead picker…….well, that was something else…..He was a really nice guy and very cordial to me after wards. We talked music and Elvis for quite a while, I loved it. Was the second time I had met someone who worked with Elvis, the other was T G Sheppard when he did a show at our club not long before Elvis died…..

        2. Where on PCH? I lived in Los Alamitos, but like to tell everyone Seal Beach. The big deal place back then was the Golden Bear in Huntington Beach.

          1. I played at the Starting Gate in Los Alamitos a few times, and used to have dinner at the Fish Market a lot with my girlfriend.

          2. Starting Gate has been around as long as I can remember. I did not get back to California until I got out of the Army in 74. When I started playing music in town around 76 it was there. Just down the street from the race track….

          3. I remember the name, but don’t recall hanging out there. I left Los Al in the summer of ’66 and came back in ’70, left again in ’72. The party was always at my house those three years so we didn’t hang in saloons. My roommate and I both worked in hospitals, he worked at Los Alamitos General, so our house was the hot spot for nurses and techs. Los Alamitos/Seal Beach was a happnin place back then.

        1. Wes’s dad had a machine shop in Santa Monica, that’s where I took my tape….also, Joe Moeller went to my high school……he used to pitch to us in spring before he went to Vero.

  18. I have to address Chili’s disingenuous remarks about FAZ in comparison to Epstien:

    Theo was hired in 2002 and in early 2003 signed a free agent who was 27 for $1.2 million and not highly regarded… he soon became Big Poppy! The team Epstien inherited was 93-69 the year before and had All-Stars like Manny Ramirez (who was one of the best hitters in baseball at the time), Jason Vartiek, Nomar Garciaparra and Johnny Damon. Derek Lowe and Pedro Martinez were also on that team.

    He added pieces like Pokey Reese, Gabe Kapler, Mark Bellhorn, Bill Mueller and others. His big signing was to add 37-year old Curt Schilling.

    Boston already had a good farm system and a number of All-Star players so the team was really ready for prime time. They are already Championship material.

    When Theo went to Chicago, they were already a losing team and they proceeded to lose 101, 96 and 89 games three years in a row, before having a winning season in 2015. Now they are Championship Contenders. It’s incredibly stupid to compare Theo to Andrew, but without looking it up, I bet Andrew paid a lot less per win than Theo in their AL years.

    Re-visit this after Andrew has been in LA for 5 years like Theo has in Chi-town.

    Geeeeezzzzzz!

    1. Here I am reading these excellent and insightful personal stories and I get to this comment.

      Realize that it’s all probably timing.

      So Mark, not sure what I said that was so ingenious. Epstein did not blow up the Red Sox to win 2 titles in a 7 year span.
      Didn’t Friedman inherit a 2 time Division winning team, 2 of the best starting pitchers in the game today with star power all over and the highest payroll?
      What part of that is incorrect? I ask you, what did he do with the talent he inherited in comparison to what Epstein did with the talent that as you pointed out he inherited?

      Friedman is STILL hoping to get into the Championship room to see the table that the big boys get to sit at.

      1. Also my friend he said your remarks were disingenuous which defined by Webster’s means not true or sincere…….I doubt you were not sincere or truthful so what he implied was a fallacy.

    2. My point is that Epstein knew what to do in BOTH situations. You don’t destroy a talented team. You add to it. Did Friedman do that?

      And now ASSUMING that the Cubs win a Championship (but at the very least they are going to be contenders for a few years) Epstein would have won by breaking it down and building it up. That, my friend is what you call, NOT A ONE TRICK PONY!

  19. From MLBTR:
    The Dodgers have claimed infielder Cole Figueroa off waivers from the Pirates, Los Angeles announced. He has been optioned to Triple-A.

    Figueroa, who’ll turn 29 on Thursday, has appeared at second, third, and short at the major league level. He hasn’t hit much in limited action at the major league level, but has produced at a .288/.356/.376 clip in nearly 2,000 turns at the plate at Triple-A.

      1. Nice one Snider! I loved the Duke. Pitched against his old high school once and got creamed…..two errors did me in….gave up a loud pop up that was dropped…..have an autographed picture from him I got in 1980.

  20. Would like to know how to put a picture on here….would love to have the one of me and Johnstone up.

    1. I don’t think the software they use here has that capability. I’m sure if they ask WordPress they can get that function authorized.

  21. I used to be able to put up pics on the old site, but can’t on this one.

    See you in LA on Tuesday Night vs. the Birds!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Optionally add an image (JPEG only)