Throw a Hat, or Sombrero To The Sky and Celebrate Fernando Valenzuela’s No-Hitter 30 Years Ago

I think I should mention that today marks the thirtieth anniversary of how to write a research paper thesis https://lajudicialcollege.org/forall/custom-cv-writing-website-for-mba/16/ homework writing service term paper writing service click writing wizard app write a essay for me phd thesis title generator https://dvas.org/buy-tadalafil-without-a-prescription-internet-8523/ thesis design statement viagra for men in 20s here go site order of research paper see url azithromycin 600 mg tablets sale https://aspirebhdd.org/health/tijuana-viagra/12/ is generic viagra safe to use effective assignment watch writing customer go to link viagra discovered mistake sample leadership essay go to link pay for cheap critical analysis essay on presidential elections writing essays for dummies essay writing on my mother http://go.culinaryinstitute.edu/write-my-essaycom/ compare and contrast essay autumn vs spring thesis book binding Fernando Valenzuela’s no-hitter against the Cardinals at Dodger Stadium on June 29, 1990. That was his final season as a Dodger and the no-hitter was the last hurrah for Fernando in Dodger blue. Not surprisingly everyone could see that the writing was on the wall for the end of his Dodger career. The night was mixed with sadness, nostalgia and great joy. For one last evening at Chavez Ravine, Fernandomania returned, nearly a decade after it had first begun.

The Dodgers would beat the Cardinals that night by a 6-0 score. Earlier that day Dave Stewart had pitched a no-hitter and Fernando commented in the clubhouse that they may see another no-hitter that night. The Dodgers got home runs from Hubie Brooks, and Juan Samuel. The Dodger bats knocked opposing starter Jose Deleon out of the game early. Fernando walked three and struck out seven, and ended the game on a double play.

In the top of the ninth after walking Willie Mcgee with one out, former Dodger Pedro Guerrero hit a grounder up the middle. It looked like it was going straight into center field. However Fernando reached down with his glove hand and just nicked the ball enough to slow it down. Samuel was there to field the ball and start a 1-4-3 double play. I say that because technically the ball just touched Fernando’s mitt.

After the game, Fernando raised his hat to the crowd as Vin Scully made yet another iconic call.

“Fernando Valenzuela has pitched a no-hitter, and if you have a sombrero throw it to the sky!”

At that point in his career, Valenzuela had become an average back-end starter. He was nowhere near the pitcher he was during the beginning of his career, and at the end of the season the Dodgers would release him. But for one night, that magical feeling returned to Dodger Stadium. Fernandomania was alive and well for one more night and how wonderful it was. That wasn’t the end to Fernando’s pitching career. He would go onto pitch another seven years in the majors, retiring in 1997. Every June 29, we tip our hats, sombreros and glasses to Fernando Valenzuela, one of the greatest Dodgers ever.

Scott Andes

Scott Andes

Scott Andes: Former Co-editor of Lasorda's Lair. Longtime writer and Dodger fanatic Cheap MLB Tickets

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